Next Steps

State law allows a Regional Transportation Authority, such as RFTA, to collect up to 5 mills in property taxes, with voter approval. In order to prepare RFTA to address the region’s future mobility challenges, the RFTA Board of Directors has carefully reviewed several “Destination 2040” funding scenarios. Following a Public Hearing on August 9, 2018, the RFTA Board unanimously voted to refer a 2.65 mill levy ballot measure to voters who reside within RFTA’s member jurisdictions, to help fund strategic improvements to the region’s transportation system.

What Would a 2.65 Mill Levy Look Like?

RESIDENTIAL

What might the proposed RFTA Mill Levy Cost a Homeowner?

Assessment Rate 7.2%
(with 0.401-mill tax credit for the 2018 residential property assessment paid in 2019). For 2019 the residential property assessment rate is anticipated to go down to 6.11%.  If so, the amounts below would be the same as they are for the 2018 residential property assessment.

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COMMERCIAL

What might the proposed RFTA Mill Levy Cost a Commercial Property Owner?

2018 Assessment Rate = 29%
(with a 0.401-mill tax credit for the 2018 commercial property assessment paid in 2019).

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2019 Assessment Rate = 29%.
For 2019 the commercial property assessment, the 0.401-mill tax credit will not be provided and the cost would be as follows:

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HOW DID WE GET HERE?

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STAGE 1 – DEFINE THE VISION (COMPLETED IN AUGUST 2016)

In this stage, RFTA met with Garfield County, Pitkin County, and Eagle County and all the cities and towns within these Counties from RFTA to Parachute (RFTA’s Service Area) to discuss transportation goals and priorities for the next 20 years. RFTA met with government staff, elected officials, major employers, and nonprofit organizations and held public meetings at Rubey Park in Aspen and 27th Street BRT Station in Glenwood Springs. We tried to reach out to just about anyone who has an interest in future transportation and who might make a difference (including you).

We discovered a lot about people’s current and future needs and expectations. This information is summarized in  Summary of Transportation Goals, Needs and Priorities – the top 10.

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STAGE 2 – DETERMINE FUTURE NEEDS (COMPLETED MARCH 2017)

In this stage, the project team created forecasts of transportation and transit demand, based on:

  • Population and Employment projections, primarily from US Census data
  • Location and extent of future residential and employment in the region, based on review of land use plans from local governments
  • Current vehicular and transit travel patterns based on RFTA ridership counts and cell phone data (stripped of personal information).

STAGE 3 – ANALYZE OPTIONS (COMPLETED JUNE 2018)

In this stage, the project team developed the following information:

  1. Inventory of RFTA’s organizational assets, including fleet size, facility capacities and staffing, to understand what services RFTA is capable of handling today, and how it must adapt to future needs
  2. An understanding of the regional transportation goals, needs and priorities
  3. Forecasts for transportation and transit demand
  4. A list of priority transportation projects, programs and costs for short term (1-5 years), medium term (6-15 years) and long-term (15+ years) implementation
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STAGE 4 – ESTABLISH FINANCIAL PLAN (COMPLETED AUGUST 2018)

State law allows a Regional Transportation Authority, such as RFTA, to collect up to 5 mills in property taxes, with voter approval. In order to prepare RFTA to address the region’s future mobility challenges, the RFTA Board of Directors has carefully reviewed several “Destination 2040” funding scenarios. A financial capacity analysis and financial model were developed to determine the project delivery timing and affordability for the various funding scenarios.

BEYOND STAGE 4 – WHAT’S NEXT?

“Destination 2040” is the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority’s (RFTA’s) plan to address the region’s current and future mobility needs. RFTA makes getting around the area easier and less expensive through the programs and services it provides, including: VelociRFTA Bus Rapid Transit, local buses, pedestrian safety enhancements, access to bike share, and maintenance of the Rio Grande recreational trail. RFTA helps reduce automobile congestion and is good for the environment, however, it faces financial challenges in order to maintain its services and programs, as well as to meet the region’s growing mobility needs. That is why, following a Public Hearing on August 9, 2018, the RFTA Board unanimously voted to refer a 2.65 mill levy ballot measure to voters who reside within RFTA’s member jurisdictions, to help fund strategic improvements to the region’s transportation system.  If you have questions or comments, please send them to info@rfta2040.com or see RFTA responses to Frequently Asked Questions. Thank you!

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Questions or Comments?